Microsoft joins the Linux Foundation

I applaud this move and Microsoft’s recent acceptance if not enhanced tolerance of the open source movement.  I believe this level of open cooperation is an important tool in the fight against cybercrime.

https://techcrunch.com/2016/11/16/microsoft-joins-the-linux-foundation/

Windows 10 haters: Try Linux on Kaby Lake chips with Dell’s new XPS 13

Given the many security challenges and loopholes in the new Windows 10 OS, combined with Microsoft’s new all or nothing patching strategy, another alternative OS and hardware platform is always welcome.  I am thrilled to see Dell embracing dedicated hardware configurations for these Linux flavors.  Add in MacOS and we are starting to see real options beyond the legacy footprint of MS Windows.

http://www.pcworld.com/article/3120815/hardware/windows-10-haters-try-linux-on-kaby-lake-chips-with-dells-new-xps-13.html

Microsoft open sources Edge JavaScript code, plans Linux port

This is quite refreshing coming from Microsoft.  I am thrilled to see they are following through on their promises and developing/sharing code in the open.  Porting to Linux is another interesting twist.  I think these types of moves are yet another signal of Microsoft’s desire to be seen as more of a solutions and services company and less of a traditional software licensing machine.

http://www.networkworld.com/article/3022447/microsoft-subnet/microsoft-open-sources-edge-javascript-code-plans-linux-port.html

Ransomware meets Linux – on the command line!

A question came up a little earlier today about the inherent security of Linux.  A vendor I was evaluating mentioned in their literature that Linux required virtually no security patching.  As such, I wanted to share this article from earlier in the week as a rebuttal.  Though not specifically malware, its a great example of the fact that security by obscurity is still a really stupid idea.

https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2015/11/11/ransomware-meets-linux-on-the-command-line/